Digital Output

While screenwriters and directors are the first and second storytellers of a movie, editors are the third ones. The editor rewrites the film for one last time before it is presented to the audience. Through editing techniques, the editor may construct or deconstruct a narrative or documentary, and shape it to his or her own will. This tool is a means of expression. It juxtaposes shots, builds scenes and sculpts a cinematic experience.Cinematic editing is an art in itself. 

Montaage comprises of experienced editors in the industry, who have worked with the finest storytellers to breathe life into commercials, music videos, short films and features. Editing is a complex craft that needs patient and rhythmic fingers and an eye for a perfect cut. 

DCP

DCP

In the language of digital cinema, a Digital Cinema Package, or DCP, is the name given to the collection of files sent to a cinema. It is a “packing crate” for files, which may or may not comprise a complete motion picture. A digital motion picture, on the other hand, is comprised of a structured set of files referred to as a Composition. A Composition is a work product, or title, examples of which include not only motion pictures, but also trailers and advertisements.

KDM

KDM is the acronym for Key Delivery Message. A KDM is required to play an encrypted movie. Each KDM enables one version of the movie to play on a target playback device for a limited duration, which could be hours, weeks, or months.

The KDM is the vehicle for securely delivering symmetric content encryption keys to authorized playback equipment. A KDM targets only one playback device, and is an expression of trust in the targeted device. Further, the trust conveyed by a KDM is only expressed for one encrypted Composition.  Content versions, expressed as a separate Composition, require a different KDM to play it.

Blue-ray

Blu-ray or Blu-ray Disc (BD) is a digital optical disc data storage format. It was designed to supersede the DVD format, and is capable of storing several hours of video in high-definition (HDTV 720p and 1080p). The name “Blu-ray” refers to the blue laser (actually a violet laser) used to read the disc, which allows information to be stored at a greater density than is possible with the longer-wavelength red laser used for DVDs.